Galway

  • Searches continued in Galway over the weekend for a man seen entering the River Corrib in the City last week.

    It’s after a member of the public witnessed a man entering the water at O’ Brien’s Bridge on Wednesday night.

    A search was carried out by emergency services assisted by the Coast Guard, but no trace of the man has yet been found.

    Oranmore Maree Coastal Search Unit assisted by members of the public carried out a search of the coastline yesterday.

    Searches are expected to resume later today.

  • 1,244 patients over the age of 75 were left waiting over 24 hours to be seen in the Emergency Department at Galway University Hospital last year.

    The HSE has confirmed that, nationally, over 11,000 patients aged over 75 were not seen within 24 hours at hospital Emergency Departments in 2017.

    The situation has been described as “borderline criminal” by Galway Sinn Fein Councillor Mairéad Farrell, who says elderly patients are often the most vulnerable, and bring treated urgently can prevent escalation of injury.

    She says it’s unacceptable that anyone is left waiting on a trolley for over 24 hours- but particularly elderly people.

     

  • A group of sixteen puppies found in Athenry earlier this week were being kept in what has been described as appalling conditions.

    Rte.ie are reporting that the dogs were rescued after a member of the public heard sounds coming from an abandoned horsebox in the Ballydavid area of the Co Galway town on Tuesday 17 July.

    Gardaí and the local dog warden attended the scenes.

    The dogs have been described as being emaciated and severely dehydrated. Many were also diseased.

    They received emergency veterinary attention before being transferred to a local animal welfare organisation.

    Seven of the dogs have died since died.

    It is suspected that they were being bred illegally for sale.

  • A 19-year-old man who died in a road collision in the early hours of yesterday morning outside Williamstown has been named.

    He was Evan Tully from Briarsfort, Williamstown.

    The collision occurred at 2.20am yesterday morning on the Williamstown to Castlerea Rd (R360), about a half a mile outside Williamstown.

    Mr Tully was seriously injured and later pronounced dead at the scene.

    Mr Tully’s remains will repose at Feeney’s Funeral Home on Sunday evening from 4-8pm.

    He will be laid to rest following 12 noon Funeral Mass on Monday in St Therese’s Church Williamstown, in Carraroe Cemetery.

  • It's emerged that 195 farmers will be directly affected by the proposed Galway City ring road.

    The N6 ring road will run around the city from Barna in the west, to Ballybrit in the East.

     

    Last month, the Cabinet approved the Galway City ringroad development, and announced that - in total - 1,000 compulsory purchase order letters would be issued.

    The Irish Farmers Journal reports that an environmental impact assessment submitted to An Bord Pleanala shows 195 farms are directly affected by the proposed road development.

    The main farm enterprises along the proposed ringroad route are beef and sheep farms -with these lands assessed as having a low to medium sensitivity to the devleopent.

    However, there is one high-sensitivity beef enterprise and two high-sensitivity dairy enterprises along the route.

    Also, the Galway Racecourse is classified as very high sensitivity, due to the equine enterprise and its regional importance.

    In total, 6 dairy farms, 119 beef farms and 4 sheep farms are in some way affected by the proposed road.

    For the environmental impact assessment, the agricultural study area consisted of 195 land parcels and 1,096 hectares of land - of which 219 hectares is within the proposed development boundary.

     

  • Over 500 artists, musicians and performers will take part in the Galway International Arts Festival, which gets underway today.

    It's one of Europe's leading international arts festivals, and this year's programme once again includes a mix of Irish and international artists and performers, with an impressive line-up of theatre, dance, comedy, music and visual art.

    This is the 41st year of Galway Arts Festival, which runs until the 29th July.

    Madness, Kodaline, The Stunning, Gavin James and the RTE Conert Orchestra are just some of the acts which will take to the stage at the Festival Big Top.

     

  • 2018 was a mixed year for house prices across the country.

    That's according to the Irish Independent, which has published its annual list of property prices.

    According to the study, prices in Kilkenny increased the most over the 12 months, up 22 percent.

    Property prices in Mayo were down 1% in the year. The average price of a house in the county is 175,000. There are big differences between different areas in the county.

    Increasing builders costs and the number of new homes being built were just some of the factors that impacted on prices in each area.

    Mark Keenan, Residential Property Editor, Irish Independent has details of the survey in Co Mayo.

    In Galway, prices in the city went up by 10% and by 3% in the county.

    Property prices in Roscommon were up 7% in the last year – where the average price is 160,000

    Prices in Sligo are up 3% in the year, where the aveage price of a home is also 160,000 euro.

     

  • It’s emerged that a number of hospitals are routinely missing their targets for treating cancer patients within 15 days of diagnosis.

    As a result, hundreds of people were last year forced to wait for chemotherapy, according to figures published in the Irish Independent.

    The worst offender was The Mater Hospital in Dublin where one-in-three cancer patients got delayed treatment last year.

    The National Cancer Control Programme has set a target that 95% of cancer patients should receive IV treatment within 15 days of diagnosis, but at Galway University Hospital, 22% of patients did not receive IV treatment within the 15-day target last year, and this figure was 25% at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

    Mayo and Sligo University Hospitals fared better, with 99% of patients at both hospitals receiving chemotherapy treatment within 15 days of diagnosis.

     

     

  • The trial of a 24 year old man charged in relation to the death of an Oughterard publican in September 2011 opened at the Galway Circuit Court yesterday.

    The body of John Kenny was discovered by family members at Kenny’s Bar, Main Street, Oughterard on the 25th of September, 2011.

    A post-mortem examination revealed he had died as a result of serious assault.

    Yesterday, a 24 year old man pleaded not guilty to the unlawful killing of John Kenny.

    The accused, who has an address in Co. Cork, was a juvenile at the time of the alleged offence and cannot be named.

    He also pleaded not guilty to a further charge of trespassing with intent to commit an offence.

    A jury of 8 men and 4 women was sworn in before Judge Rory McCabe and the trial at the Galway Circuit Court is expected to last around two weeks.

     

     

  • 522 people are waiting on trolleys in hospitals across the country today. 

    According to the INMO, the worst affected is University Hospital Limerick where 68 people are waiting for beds. 

    The second most-overcrowded is University Hospital Galway, where 37 patients are on trolleys.

    There are 16 patients waiting for a bed at Mayo University Hospital, 12 in Sligo and 2 on trolleys at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

     

     

     

     

  • The overcrowding crisis continues at Galway University Hospital, with 43 patients on trolleys today.

    Yesterday there were 50 patients on trolleys at the Galway Hospital, and the full capacity protocol was put in place, with people urged to contact their GP before attending the Emergency Department.

    Today, there are 465 patients on hospital trolleys across the country, according to the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation.

    Galway University Hospital is the third most overcrowded with 43 patients waiting for a bed, with 15 people on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital and 4 at Mayo University Hospital.

     

     

  • Despite the Summer season, overcrowding continues at hospitals across the country with 458 people on trolleys today, according to the INMO.

    Galway University Hospital is the second most overcrowded, with 50 patients waiting for admission to a bed.

    The busiest is University Hospital Limerick with 56 patients on trolleys.

    Elsewhere in this region, there are 16 on trolleys at Sligo University Hospital,  4 at Mayo University Hospital and 1 at Portiuncla Hospital.

     

     

     

     

  • Galway University Hospital is topping the INMO's daily trolley count today, with 52 patients waiting for a bed at the hospital.

    This is the highest figure nationally today, with 475 patients on trolleys at hospitals across the country.

    Sligo University Hospital has 30 patients waiting for a bed, with 14 at Mayo University Hospital and 3 at Portiuncla Hospital in Ballinasloe.

     

     

     

     

     

  • The number of patients on hospital trolleys across the country has increased significantly this week, compared to last week.

    Today, there are 565 patients waiting for a bed - with 583 on trolleys yesterday and 565 on Monday.

    Last week's trolley figures were between 300 and 400.

    The INMO figures show Galway University Hospital is the third most-overcrowded today with 44 patients on trolleys, while there are 22 waiting for a bed at Sligo University Hospital and 13 at Mayo University Hospital.

    The ongoing overcrowding and the pressure this is putting on nursing staff are among the reasons INMO members are taking strike action later this month.

    Nurses will go on a 24-hour strike on Wednesday 30th January - three weeks from today - with 5 further days of strike action planned for February.

    The union says members are fed up dealing with low pay and poor working conditions.

    However, the Irish Patients Association says patients lives are at risk if the proposed strike by nurses goes ahead at the end of the month.

  • Galway University Hospital is once again the most overcrowded in the country, with 57 patients on trolleys today.

    According to the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation, the number on trolleys nationally has risen to 558.

    This includes 57 at UHG, 25 at Sligo University Hospital and 26 at Mayo University Hospital.

     Figures also show that, during the month of November, 178 patients spent time on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital, with an average waiting time of 12 hours on a trolley in the Emergency Department.

    The figures were confirmed to Castlebar Independent Councillor Michael Kilcoyne at a recent meeting of the HSE regional forum in Galway.

    Councillor Kilcoyne claims there are many Third World and developing countries that have a more satisfactory health service at present that what's being provided to sick people in Co Mayo....

  • The number of patients on trolleys at Irish hospitals today has reached 643.

    According to the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation, there are 27 patients waiting for admission to a bed at both Sligo and Galway University Hospitals, with 7 on trolleys at Mayo University Hospital and 18 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe.

    Meanwhile, the Health Minister Simon Harris has said he will offer every student nurse and midwife a full-time, permanent job once they graduate.

    Minister Harris has tweeted to say that letter is on its way to each one of them.

    He posted that the HSE will need more and more front-line staff as they plan for more beds and facilities.

  • There are 649 people waiting on trolleys at hospitals across the country today, according to the latest trolley watch from the Irish Nurses & Midwives Organisation.

    Yesterday, levels reached a new record high of 714.

    Today, there are 28 patients on trolleys at Galway University Hospital, 21 in Sligo, 19 at Mayo University Hospital and 13 at Portiuncla in Ballinasloe.

    The worst affected is University Hospital Limerick where there are 58 people waiting for a hospital bed.

    The HSE has announced that non-urgent elective surgery is being cancelled at hospitals across the county, as they try and tackle the backlog of patients on trolleys.

    A spokesperson for the Saolta Hospital Group told Midwest News today that while non-urgent electives are cancelled at Mayo University Hospital, some urgent elective procedures are proceeding.

    The spokesperson said patients have been contacted directly in relation to their procedures.

    At Galway University Hospital , some non-urgent surgeries scheduled for today have been deferred.

    Affected patients are being contacted directly, so those who have not heard from their hospital should attend for their appointment as scheduled.

  • There is good news for Galway on the jobs front with 75 new posts announced this morning.

    Quidel Corporation, which makes medical diagnostic equipment, is establishing a Business Centre in the city.

    The international company already employs approximately 1,200 people across the world.

    Quidel is currently recruiting professionals for its Galway operation in areas including Finance, Human Resources, Customer Service, and Technical Support.

  • The 7th Annual Business Leaders Sleepout event takes place tonight in aid of COPE Galway’s Homeless Services.

    This is COPE Galway’s biggest and longest fundraising event of the year and will see 32 people from Galway’s business community sleeping rough for 12 hours from later this evening, to raise awareness about homelessness in Galway and help raise funds for COPE Galway’s Homeless Services.

    COPE Galway’s most recent quarterly one day census identified a total of 195 adults and 221 children as living in emergency accommodation provided directly by COPE Galway and in private emergency accommodation such as hotels and B&Bs. Of this figure, 84 were families. There were also 27 people sleeping rough that night.

    Sharon Fitzpatrick is the Head of Development with COPE Galway and told Midwest News today that the sleepout raises much needed funds and awareness of the current situation in Galway.

  • Additional bus services from Galway to An Cheathrú Rua will come on stream from next September as a result of intense negotiations.

    That’s according to Galway West Fianna Fail TD Eamon O Cuiv.

    Deputy O Cuiv says currently, the last bus leaves Galway at around 6 o’clock in the evening; however there is demand for continuing services up until at least 11pm.

    Bus Eireann say they will introduce half hour frequency services on the An Cheathrú Rua to Galway service at peak commuter lines.

    There will also be three night services at 7pm, 9pm, and 11pm.